The School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management was disestablished on 1 January, 2017.

Following a review, the school was merged with the School of Earth Sciences to create the new School of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

The School of Earth and Environmental Sciences website can be found at https://sees.uq.edu.au/

Chiara Wood provides advice to the Minister, Director-General and other departments on planning and development law.
Chiara Wood provides advice to the Minister, Director-General and other departments on planning and development law.
Chiara Wood graduated with first class honours from the Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning (BRTP) at UQ and then continued for a further three years to complete a degree in law.
 
Her professional career started early with one of her essays published as an article in the Queensland Planner while she was still at university. Now Ms Wood is working as the Principal Legal Officer at the Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning in Brisbane.
 
“I work in the planning law team of the Legal Services division and my BRTP definitely helped me in getting this job, as a good understanding of the planning system is required,” she said.
 
Ms Wood provides advice to the Minister, Director-General and other departments on planning and development law, projects and infrastructure, and statutory interpretation.
 
She also advises on amendments to legislation administered by the Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning.
 
In her busy schedule Ms Wood manages to find the time to dedicate to tutoring at UQ in regulatory frameworks for environmental management and planning; passing on her knowledge to the next generation of environmental managers and planners.
 
“Her experience as a practising environmental and planning lawyer is invaluable in the course and it is a wonderful bonus that she is also one of our BRTP graduates,” Dr Chris McGrath, course coordinator, said.
 
Whilst at university Ms Wood followed the path less travelled, combining law and planning studies to create her own catered ‘dual degree’ program.
 
“It was not a recognised dual degree. It took me an additional three years after I graduated from BRTP to finish my Bachelor of Laws,” she said.
 
The ability to take planning subjects as electives in her law degree gave Ms Wood the flexibility she needed to tackle both fields.
 
Her commitment to her studies did not prevent Ms Wood from enjoying the social side of university.
 
“The whole graduating class of 2003 was quite close knit and I made some life-long friends. The best part of my BRTP degree was meeting my future husband!” she said.
 
In the future Ms Wood says that she hopes to continue to work in the field of environmental and planning law and maybe branch out in to alternative dispute resolution and work for the Planning and Environment Court as a mediator.

Last updated: Oct 31, 2012